General Dentistry

Scaling & Polishing

Scaling removes the hard tartar which forms on your teeth like scale inside a kettle. You can't remove it just by brushing your teeth. Scaling also removes trapped food and plaque containing millions of germs, which can cause tooth decay and gum disease. Stains from coffee, tea, cigarettes or red wine are also cleaned away when your dentist polishes your teeth.

If you clean your teeth very thoroughly anyway, your scale and polish will take less time.

Crowns and Bridges

Dental Crowns

What are dental crowns?

Dental crowns are restorations that protect damaged, cracked or broken down teeth. A crown strengthens your existing, damaged tooth so as to preserve its functionality. Dental crowns are also commonly known as caps (because a crown sits over your existing tooth, covering the entire outer surface).

Why might I need crowns?

  • If your tooth has undergone significant decay and there is not enough tooth structure remaining to support a filling or an inlay and maintain functionaility.
  • If a large portion of your tooth has fractured and it cannot be built up using traditional composite bonding techniques .
  • If you have a large cavity and opt for the additional protection a crown offers to your tooth over a large composite filling or an inlay.
  • If you have had a dental implant to replace a missing tooth, a crown will be fitted to the abutment of the titanium implant.
  • Following root canal treatment, a crown is often needed to strengthen the tooth.
  • If you grind your teeth and have a poor diet, acid errosion may reduce your teeth to a point where the only option available is to crown them.
  • For cosmetic reasons, to improve the aesthetics of your smile, you may opt for all porcelain cosmetic crowns.
    • Are dental crowns always the best option?

      Crowns should not be the first choice just to improve the aesthetics of your teeth, because a dentist needs to grind a significant portion of the original tooth away. Less invasive alternatives include veneers or dental bonding. Crowns are required when the strength of the tooth supporting the restoration is compromised, since veneers and dental bonding restorations are only as strong as the supporting tooth.

      What materials can crowns be made from?

      In modern-day dentistry. there is a wide variety of dental materials to choose from. Some crowns are made from full gold, where as others are made from an alloy of metals fused to a porcelain outer shell. After time, crowns that are made from a combination of metal fused to porcelain can begin to show dark gum lines that are not aesthetically attractive. All-porcelain or -ceramic crowns are the best choice for a natural cosmetic look. There are many different brands and types of porcelain crowns, and the variation between the costs of dental crowns at different dental practices may well reflect the quality of the materials used.

      What does the procedure of having dental crowns fitted involve?

      Once you have had a consultation with your dentist and discussed all the treatment options, he/she will prepare the tooth for crowning. The first stage is to clean the tooth, remove any decay and reshape it using a burr (a special dental drill for shaping teeth) under local anaesthesia. The shape of the prepared tooth is usually tapered to allow the crown sit comfortably over the top of it. Once the tooth is prepared, an impression (mould) of your teeth will be taken using a special "dental putty". This impression is sent to a dental laboratory, which will use the impression of the prepared tooth as a guide to fabricate the new crown to fit perfectly. It usually takes between one to two days for a laboratory technician to custom-fabricate your new crown. During this time, your dentist will fit you with a temporary crown to cover and protect your prepared tooth.

      On your second visit, your dentist will remove the temporary crown and roughen the outer surface of your prepared tooth with a special etching acid to give the dental cement a good surface to bond to. Your dentist will sit the crown over your tooth to see if it fits with your smile correctly and is the right colour and shape. Once you are both happy with the restoration and how it looks, your dentist will cement the crown firmly into place.

      How long do crowns last?

      This will depend largely on how well you look after your teeth. Dental crowns require the same level of care and attention as your natural teeth. Provided you have a good oral hygiene program, attend regular checkups at your dentist, don't grind your teeth, maintain a tooth-kind diet and don't do things like open beer bottles with your teeth, a high-quality dental crown can last 10-15 years.

      In specialists dental and implant center we are giving a warranty for 10 years.

Dental Bridges

Dental bridges literally bridge the gap created by one or more missing teeth.

A bridge is made up of two crowns for the teeth on either side of the gap -- these two anchoring teeth are called abutment teeth -- and a false tooth/teeth in between. These false teeth are called pontics and can be made from gold, alloys, porcelain, or a combination of these materials. Dental bridges are supported by natural teeth or implants.

What Are the Benefits of Dental Bridges?

Bridges can:

  • Restore your smile
  • Restore the ability to properly chew and speak
  • Maintain the shape of your face
  • Distribute the forces in your bite properly by replacing missing teeth
  • Prevent remaining teeth from drifting out of position

What Types of Dental Bridges Are Available?

There are three main types of dental bridges:

  • Traditional bridges involve creating a crown for the tooth or implant on either side of the missing tooth, with a pontic in between. Traditional bridges are the most common type of bridge and are made of either porcelain fused to metal or ceramics.
  • Cantilever bridges are used when there are adjacent teeth on only one side of the missing tooth or teeth.
  • Maryland bonded bridges (also called a resin-bonded bridge or a Maryland bridge) are made of plastic teeth and gums supported by a metal framework. Metal wings on each side of the bridge are bonded to your existing teeth.

What Is the Process for Getting a Dental Bridge?

During the first visit for getting a dental bridge, the abutment teeth are prepared. Preparation involves recontouring these teeth by removing a portion of enamel to allow room for a crown to be placed over them. Next, impressions of the teeth are made, which serve as a model from which the bridge, pontic, and crowns will be made by a dental lab. Your dentist will make a temporary bridge to wear to protect the exposed teeth and gums while the bridge is being made.

During the second visit, your temporary bridge will be removed and the new permanent bridge will be checked and adjusted, as necessary, to achieve a proper fit. Multiple visits may be required to check the fit of the metal framework and bite. This is dependent on each individual's case. If the dental bridge is a fixed (permanent) bridge, your dentist may temporarily cement it in place for a couple of weeks to make sure it is fitting properly. After a couple weeks, the bridge is permanently cemented into place.

Periodontal Treatment

Gum contouring, also known as gum reshaping, is a cosmetic form of dental treatment used to improve the general look of a person's teeth. It is primarily used in cases where the individual has what is commonly known as 'gummy smile'. This is a condition in which the gums cover too much of the teeth, usually the front teeth, and this can leave the length of the teeth looking too short, which can affect a person's general desire to smile.

This can have an effect on an individual's self-confidence and may see them do their best not to smile in public. Thankfully, gum contouring is a dental treatment which is painless and able to solve the problem of 'gummy smile' through quick and painless treatment.

What Is Gum Contouring?

Gum contouring is a procedure which is most commonly done through the use of a scalpel. However, technological advances have seen special laser devices emerging in the treatment of 'gummy smile'. The scalpel or laser will be used to trim away at any excessive gum overlying the teeth. This is a quick and often painless treatment. The scalpel will make the process slightly longer, and the laser also has the added bonus of being able to seal blood vessels during the procedure. This will help to limit the amount of blood released due to the incision. Along with the use of crowns and veneers after the treatment is complete, gum contouring is a simple procedure that can easily remedy 'gummy smile'.

In specialists dental and implant center we are using lasers for painless treatment

What does the gum contouring procedure involve?

To begin with a local anaesthetic is used to take away feeling from the area where the procedure is to commence. The scalpel or laser device will then be used to trim away at the excessive gum that is covering the front teeth. As well as cutting away at the gum, the dental practitioner will also work to reshape the gum that is to remain in place. The healing process is relatively quick, but will be made faster if the laser device is used, as it works to seal blood vessels, in order to prevent excessive bleeding once the procedure is complete.

There are certain instances in which the removable and reshaping of the gum is not enough. If this is the case then the dental practitioner may need to remove some of the bone in which the teeth are rooted. This will be down to the judgement of the dental practitioner, should they think the gum will reform too far down on the teeth. This may seem more daunting to some than the mere removable of excessive gum, but it is just as simple a procedure. Once treatment is complete you may be prescribed with veneers or crowns to help improve the look of your smile.

Root Canal Treatment & Surgery

To understand a root canal procedure, it helps to know about the anatomy of the tooth. Inside the tooth, under the white enamel and a hard layer called the dentin, is a soft tissue called the pulp. The pulp contains blood vessels, nerves and connective tissue, and helps to grow the root of your tooth during development. In a fully developed tooth, the tooth can survive without the pulp because the tooth continues to be nourished by the tissues surrounding it.

Endodontic treatment treats the inside of the tooth. Endodontic treatment is necessary when the pulp becomes inflamed or infected. The inflammation or infection can have a variety of causes: deep decay, repeated dental procedures on the tooth, faulty crowns, or a crack or chip in the tooth. In addition, trauma to a tooth may cause pulp damage even if the tooth has no visible chips or cracks. If pulp inflammation or infection is left untreated, it can cause pain or lead to an abscess.

How does endodontic treatment save the tooth?

During root canal treatment, the inflamed or infected pulp is removed and the inside of the tooth is carefully cleaned and disinfected, then filled and sealed with a rubber-like material called gutta-percha. Afterwards, the tooth is restored with a crown or filling for protection. After restoration, the tooth continues to function like any other tooth.

Contrary to jokes about the matter, modern root canal treatment is very similar to having a routine filling and usually can be completed in one or two appointments, depending on the condition of your tooth and your personal circumstances. You can expect a comfortable experience during and after your appointment.

Saving the natural tooth with root canal treatment has many advantages:

  • Efficient chewing
  • Normal biting force and sensation
  • Natural appearance
  • Protects other teeth from excessive wear or strain

Endodontic treatment helps you maintain your natural smile, continue eating the foods you love and limits the need for ongoing dental work. With proper care, most teeth that have had root canal treatment can last as long as other natural teeth and often for a lifetime.

In specialists dental and implant center our doctors are specialised in single sitting Root canal treatment where it is finished in single sitting .

Dentures

Tooth loss and dentures

Tooth loss can occur for many reasons (periodontal disease, decay or trauma). Dentures have been used to replace missing teeth for many years now. Alternative methods used to replace missing teeth include dental implants and fixed bridges.

The loss of your teeth can have negative effects on your self-confidence, your ability to chew food and your bite. Since your teeth provide structure and support to your cheeks, tooth loss can result in the sagging of your cheeks and make you appear older than you are. It is essential that your missing teeth are replaced as soon as possible.

Dentures are removable replacements for your teeth, designed to look and function like your own natural teeth and surrounding gum tissues. Modern-day dentures can look very realistic and natural and feel comfortable.

Types of dentures

  • When all your teeth are missing, a complete denture is used to replace them, whereas if only a few teeth need replacing, a partial denture or overdenture is used. Partial dentures can prevent your existing healthy teeth from shifting following tooth loss.
  • Dentures are generally fabricated from acrylic resins. With advances in modern cosmetic dentistry, there are a wide variety of materials available for dentures, and your dentist may give you some options, including the latest flexible Valplast cosmetic dentures.

Holding dentures in place

Dentures should be held in place by their natural suction to your gums; sometimes a fixative may also be used. However, they tend to come loose and this can cause difficulties when trying to eat certain foods. Dentures can be fixed securely in place by dental implants or mini implants, which can give you the confidence to eat whatever you want without having to worry about your dentures coming loose or falling out. More patients seem to be opting for treatment with implants now. Despite their high cost, they have a dramatic effect on improving the quality of life

How should I look after my dentures?

It is important to keep your dentures clean at all times. You should remove your dentures at night to give your gums "a rest" and the chance to be exposed to your natural saliva, which will keep them healthy. It is highly recommended that you brush your dentures and soak them in a glass of cold water whilst you aren't wearing them. You can add special cleaning tablets to the water when you soak your dentures. Always brush your dentures before putting them back into your mouth. If your dentures begin to collect debris or stains that you cannot remove by normal brushing, your dentist or hygienist will be able to professionally clean your dentures for you. It is important to visit your dentist regularly to ensure that your dentures are in good condition and continue to fit your gums, as the shape of your gums and underlying bone can change with time. Loose fitting dentures can cause irritation and inflammation of your gums and problems with eating and speech.

How long do dentures last?

This depends on many factors, including how you take care of them and also how much you use them in terms of general wear and tear. Over time, dentures can become loose as your gums shrink and your bite changes. When this happens, you may need a new set of dentures, or in some cases, a simple modification of your existing dentures may solve the problem.

The procedure

On your first appointment, your dentist will assess your needs and thoroughly examine your mouth for suitability for dentures. Some of your existing teeth may need to be extracted first or you may need treatment to get your gums into good health before commencing any treatment.

An impression (mould) of your gums will be taken and used as a model to fabricate your dentures to fit the contours of your mouth exactly. A dental technician will make your dentures to your dentist's exact specifications.

Tooth Extraction & Wisdom Tooth Surgery

An oral and maxillofacial surgeon or your dentist can remove (extract) a wisdom tooth. The procedure often can be done in the dentist's or surgeon's office. You may have the surgery in the hospital, especially if you are having all your wisdom teeth pulled at one time or if you are at high risk for complications.

If you have any infections, surgery will usually be delayed until the infection has cleared up. Your doctor or dentist may have you take antibiotics to help heal the infection.